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Idaho killer could have been ‘hiding in the noise’ of the house

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Almost seven weeks have passed since four students were stabbed to death in their beds in a small US town, leaving the community shocked. On December 30, police arrested suspect Brian Kohberger in connection with the fatal stabbings of Kaylee Goncalves, Maddie Mogen, Xana Kernodle and Ethan Chapin. The suspect’s attorney, Jason LaBar, has said he “is eager to be exonerated of these charges and looks forward to resolving these matters as promptly as possibly”. Key questions about the night of the killings remain unanswered, with police set to release more details about their investigation in the coming days.

Prosecutors allege Kohberger broke into the students’ rental home “with the intent to commit murder”.

According to Robin Dreeke, retired FBI special agent and former head of the Counterintelligence Behavioral Analysis Program, whoever is responsible for the killings may have been enable by a noisy house.

“It might be easier for a predator to hide in the noise,” Mr Dreeke told Express.co.uk.

He cited the fact that the house was in a party district and the residence had been hit with noise complaints.

Bodycam footage shows multiple police visits to the house over such complaints before the students’ were killed.

Footage shows Ms Kernodle being confronted by cops just two months before she and three friends were stabbed to death.

READ MORE: Who is Bryan Kohberger? Everything you need to know about the Idaho murders suspect

The noisy house could provide provided the perfect cover for the killerIdaho murders: The noisy house could provide provided the perfect cover for the killer (Image: Getty Images)

“This place was highly trafficked with a lot of people having parties there,” said Mr Dreeke.

The ex-FBI agent continued: “When you have that kind of volume it becomes a challenge because loud noises and disturbances at all times of night and day look normal.”

The noisy surroundings may have allowed the killer to slip in undetected but it remains unclear whether it was a targeted attack at an individual or the venue itself.

According to Mr Dreeke, a common misconception about killers is that they have it all figured out.

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It's unclear where it was a targeted attack at an individual or the venue itselfIdaho murders: It’s unclear where it was a targeted attack at an individual or the venue itself (Image: Getty Images)

The prime suspect was surveilled for four days before his arrestBryan Kohberger: The prime suspect was surveilled for four days before his arrest (Image: WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY)

The murder weapon has also not been located, Moscow Police Chief James Fry said on Friday.

Investigators honed in on Kohberger as the suspect through DNA evidence and by confirming his ownership of a white Hyundai Elantra seen near the crime scene, according to two law enforcement sources briefed on the investigation.

An FBI surveillance team watched him for four days before his arrest. Genetic genealogy techniques were used to connect Kohberger to unidentified DNA evidence, another source with knowledge of the case told CNN.

The DNA was run through a public database to find potential family member matches and subsequent investigative work by law enforcement led to him as the suspect, the source said.

Kohberger is expected to attend an extradition hearing on January 3.

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